Infant Journal
for neonatal and paediatric healthcare professionals

Establishing a neonatal telemedicine service in Liverpool

Fauzia Paize
Consultant Neonatologist, Liverpool Women’s Hospital
fauzia.paize@lwh.nhs.uk

Simon Minford
Advanced Paediatric Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Innovation Consultant, Alder Hey Children’s Hospital

Joanne Minford
Consultant Paediatric and Neonatal Surgeon, Alder Hey Children’s Hospital

Christopher Dewhurst
Consultant Neonatologist, Liverpool Women’s Hospital

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Keywords
aplasia cutis congenita; skin disorder; congenital; placental infarct; fetus papyraceus
Key points
  1. Extensive ACC lesions on the trunk and limbs are rare.
  2. ACC can be associated with placental infarcts or the in utero death of a twin fetus, as in the case presented here.
  3. Obstetric history should review maternal medications/infections during pregnancy, determine an initial multiple pregnancy with death of a co-twin and investigate any placental anomalies.
  4. Despite their large size, truncal and limb ACC lesions usually resolve within the first few months of life.

Also published in Infant:

VOLUME 15/ISSUE 3, MAY 2019
Cleft palate and oral synechiae in a newborn infant
Cleft lip or palate associated with fibrous bands, also known as oral synechiae, is rare. This report describes a newborn infant with four fibrous bands in the oral cavity, a left-sided cleft lip and a cleft of the hard and soft palate. The fibrous bands made feeding difficult and raised concerns about the baby’s airway as they prevented normal positioning of the tongue.

Read more...