Infant Journal
for neonatal and paediatric healthcare professionals

A call for zero separation – restrictive policies and their impact on neonatal care in light of COVID-19

More than one year into the pandemic and we are well aware that COVID-19 is affecting neonatal care. In many places, possibly in more ways than we initially appreciated. Recent scientific research has revealed that neonatal care in low- and middle-income countries has been affected to an extent that threatens the implementation of life-saving interventions.1 Reasons for this development are certainly plentiful, including the concerns of medical staff and parents about contracting the coronavirus – a worry that in many places had been accelerated by the immense pressure put on the health system.

Sarah Fuegenschuh
Head of Communications

Johanna Kostenzer
Head of Scientific Affairs – Maternal and Newborn Health

European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants

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Keywords
postpartum depression; psychological screening; hospital anxiety and depression scale; thematic analysis
Key points
  1. Mothers on the NNU are at greater risk of psychological distress, which can have a detrimental impact on the baby and the family unit.
  2. Detecting psychological distress is vital.
  3. Staff interviews were conducted and thematically analysed. Results showed that the HADS was beneficial to mothers and clinical practice, and helpful for identifying and enhancing access to psychological support.

Also published in Infant:

VOLUME 17/ISSUE 3, MAY 2021
Trauma in fathers following complicated childbirth: the need for intervention
It is well known that the mental health of both parents, especially in the early post-partum period, can have a significant negative impact on the psychological wellbeing of an infant. There is growing evidence that fathers can experience trauma, potentially resulting in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following the complicated delivery of their child. Currently there is little research that has been conducted on the prevalence of PTSD in these fathers, or the need for them to be treated accordingly. An extensive literature review was conducted to assess the current status of the research in this field; the clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

Read more...